Primates

, Volume 24, Issue 4, pp 594–601

Chimpanzees of Sapo Forest, Liberia: Density, nests, tools and meat-eating

  • James R. Anderson
  • Elizabeth A. Williamson
  • Janis Carter
Short Communications

DOI: 10.1007/BF02381692

Cite this article as:
Anderson, J.R., Williamson, E.A. & Carter, J. Primates (1983) 24: 594. doi:10.1007/BF02381692

Abstract

Two months were spent surveying for chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) in the Sapo Forest, eastern Liberia. The population density, as estimated from the number of nests found on transects, appears lower than that in other forest sites. Nests were more similar to those of other forest-living chimpanzees than of a savannah population. Most nests were found in areas of primary forest. Evidence was found of the chimpanzees using stones as hammers to break open four species of nut; there may be differences in materials and techniques used in this behaviour between Sapo chimpanzees and those in Tai Forest, Ivory Coast. Analysis of faeces revealed that Sapo chimpanzees eat meat.

Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • James R. Anderson
    • 1
  • Elizabeth A. Williamson
    • 1
  • Janis Carter
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of StirlingStirlingScotland
  2. 2.The Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Project, Wildlife Conservation Department, Ministry of Water Resources and EnvironmentBanjulThe Gambia