Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 22, Issue 9, pp 1607–1619

Electroantennogram activity from antennae ofCeratitis capitata (Wied.) to fresh orange airborne volatiles

Authors

  • M. M. Hernández
    • Instituto de Tecnología química, Dpto de BiotecnologíaUniversidad Politécnia
  • I. Sanz
    • Instituto de Tecnología química, Dpto de BiotecnologíaUniversidad Politécnia
  • M. Adelantado
    • Instituto de Tecnología química, Dpto de BiotecnologíaUniversidad Politécnia
  • S. Ballach
    • Dpto de Estadíslica e Investigación OperativaUniversidad Politécnica
  • E. Primo
    • Instituto de Tecnología química, Dpto de BiotecnologíaUniversidad Politécnia
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02272401

Cite this article as:
Hernández, M.M., Sanz, I., Adelantado, M. et al. J Chem Ecol (1996) 22: 1607. doi:10.1007/BF02272401

Abstract

Twenty-six compounds have been identified from fresh orange airborne volatiles, the most abundant being limonene and alloaromadendrene. Ethyl- and butylhexanoates were found in middle concentrations, whereas the other compounds occur at low levels. Electroantennograms recorded fromCeratitis capitata Wied. (males and females) revealed limonene. butyl hexanoate, dihydrocarvone, and limonene oxide to be most active. In the case of dihydrocarvone, 4-ethyl acetophenone, and carvone, female antennae give greater responses than antennae of males. Limonene oxide was more active for males than females. Total airborne volatiles recovered from oranges elicited high EAGs, with females being more sensitive than males.

Key Words

Orangesfruit volatilesodorCeratitis capitataMediterranean fruit flyDipteraTephritidaeolfactionelectroantennogramelectrophysiology
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996