Psychopharmacology

, Volume 122, Issue 2, pp 115–121

Bretazenil modulates sleep EEG and nocturnal hormone secretion in normal men

Authors

  • J. Guldner
    • Max Planck Institute of PsychiatryClinical Institute, Department of Psychiatry
  • L. Trachsel
    • Max Planck Institute of PsychiatryClinical Institute, Department of Psychiatry
  • C. Kratschmayr
    • Max Planck Institute of PsychiatryClinical Institute, Department of Psychiatry
  • B. Rothe
    • Max Planck Institute of PsychiatryClinical Institute, Department of Psychiatry
  • F. Holsboer
    • Max Planck Institute of PsychiatryClinical Institute, Department of Psychiatry
  • A. Steiger
    • Max Planck Institute of PsychiatryClinical Institute, Department of Psychiatry
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/BF02246085

Cite this article as:
Guldner, J., Trachsel, L., Kratschmayr, C. et al. Psychopharmacology (1995) 122: 115. doi:10.1007/BF02246085

Abstract

Preclinical data suggest that the imidazo-diazepinone derivative bretazenil (Ro 16-6028) has anxiolytic and anticonvulsant properties with only weak sedative effects. We examined the influence of oral administration of 1 mg bretazenil on the sleep EEG and the concomitant nocturnal secretion of cortisol, growth hormone and prolactin in ten healthy young men. After bretazenil we found a significant increase in stage 2 sleep and a significant reduction in stage 3 sleep. REM latency was prolonged. Spectral analysis of sleep-EEG power revealed a decrease in delta and in theta power and an increase in sigma power. We found no significant influence on sleep onset latency or on intermittent wakefulness. Bretazenil prompted a significant decrease in cortisol secretion and a significant increase in prolactin release. It had no major influence on growth hormone secretion.

Key words

BretazenilSleep EEGCortisolGrowth hormoneProlactinGABA benzodiazepine receptorEEG power spectra

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995