Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 53–65

Conductive hearing loss in autistic, learning-disabled, and normal children

Authors

  • Donald E. P. Smith
    • School of Education, Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Michigan
  • Samuel D. Miller
    • University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Michael Stewart
    • School of Education, Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Michigan
  • Timothy L. Walter
    • School of Education, Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Michigan
  • James V. McConnell
    • School of Education, Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Michigan
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02211818

Cite this article as:
Smith, D.E.P., Miller, S.D., Stewart, M. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (1988) 18: 53. doi:10.1007/BF02211818
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Abstract

Katz (1978) has suggested that mild, fluctuating conductive hearing loss due to middle-ear anomalies may account for the language and attention problems of learning-disabled children. His position was extended here to include autism. Normal, learning-disabled, and autistic children received repeated impedance measures over 5 weeks. A repeated-measures ANOVA of central tendency and variablility values led to the conclusions that (1) fluctuating, negative middle-ear pressure greater than normal characterizes both autistic and learning-disabled children, (2) the negative pressure is greater in autistic than in learning-disabled children, and (3) the condition is typically bilateral for autistic children.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988