European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience

, Volume 243, Issue 1, pp 7–10

Increased serum soluble interleukin-2 receptors in schizophrenic monozygotic twins

Authors

  • Mark Hyman Rapaport
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San Diego School of Medicine
    • The Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental HealthSt. Elisabeth Hospital
    • The Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Psychiatric Service of the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    • The Clinical Therapeutics BranchNational Institute of Mental Health
    • The Division of Intramural ResearchNational Institute of Mental Health
  • E. Fuller Torrey
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San Diego School of Medicine
    • The Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental HealthSt. Elisabeth Hospital
    • The Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Psychiatric Service of the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    • The Clinical Therapeutics BranchNational Institute of Mental Health
    • The Division of Intramural ResearchNational Institute of Mental Health
  • Cathy G. McAllister
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San Diego School of Medicine
    • The Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental HealthSt. Elisabeth Hospital
    • The Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Psychiatric Service of the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    • The Clinical Therapeutics BranchNational Institute of Mental Health
    • The Division of Intramural ResearchNational Institute of Mental Health
  • David L. Nelson
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San Diego School of Medicine
    • The Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental HealthSt. Elisabeth Hospital
    • The Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Psychiatric Service of the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    • The Clinical Therapeutics BranchNational Institute of Mental Health
    • The Division of Intramural ResearchNational Institute of Mental Health
  • David Pickar
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San Diego School of Medicine
    • The Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental HealthSt. Elisabeth Hospital
    • The Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Psychiatric Service of the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    • The Clinical Therapeutics BranchNational Institute of Mental Health
    • The Division of Intramural ResearchNational Institute of Mental Health
  • Steven M. Paul
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San Diego School of Medicine
    • The Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental HealthSt. Elisabeth Hospital
    • The Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh
    • Psychiatric Service of the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    • The Clinical Therapeutics BranchNational Institute of Mental Health
    • The Division of Intramural ResearchNational Institute of Mental Health
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF02191517

Cite this article as:
Rapaport, M.H., Torrey, E.F., McAllister, C.G. et al. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Nuerosci (1993) 243: 7. doi:10.1007/BF02191517

Summary

There is a confusing history of immune findings associated with schizophrenia. At least some of these discrepant results may be artifacts caused by heterogeneity. In an attempt to decrease heterogeneity, we studied three groups of monozygotic twins who were either discordant for schizophrenia, concordant and ill, or concordant and well. This comparison minimizes environmental and genetic variance, and heightens differences that are actually due to the disorder. Overall, schizophrenic subjects had higher levels of serum soluble interleukin-2 receptors (SIL-2Rs) than unaffected individuals (480.8, SD 238.6 U/ml vs 380.9, SD 170.6 U/ml;F=5.256,df=1.61,P=0.02). When data from discordant and concordant twin groups were analysed separately, both the discordant ill twins (P=0.06) and concordant ill twin pairs (P=0.08) showed trends towards higher serum SIL-2R levels than their respective control groups. These data contribute to the growing body of evidence that immune activation is associated with some forms of schizophrenia.

Key words

ImmunologySchizophreniaTwinsSoluble interleukin-2 receptors

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993