Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 195–198

The “Steakhouse syndrome”

Primary and definitive diagnosis and therapy

Authors

  • J. Stadler
    • Klinikum rechts der IsarChirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universität
  • A. H. Hölscher
    • Klinikum rechts der IsarChirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universität
  • H. Feussner
    • Klinikum rechts der IsarChirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universität
  • J. Dittler
    • Klinikum rechts der IsarChirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universität
  • J. R. Siewert
    • Klinikum rechts der IsarChirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universität
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF02171545

Cite this article as:
Stadler, J., Hölscher, A.H., Feussner, H. et al. Surg Endosc (1989) 3: 195. doi:10.1007/BF02171545

Summary

Over a period of 5 years, 28 instances of acute food impaction of the esophagus were documented in 26 patients at our institution. In all patients the impacted bolus was successfully removed without complication using a flexible endoscope. Underlying diseases were identified during primary endoscopy in 31% of the cases. Further diagnostic workup was performed in all but 5 of the patients. After adequate evaluation pathologic findings were demonstrated in 90% of the cases (38% malignant and 52% benign diseases). Long-term therapy was deemed necessary in 17 of these 21 patients. Operative intervention was indicated in 4 cases, 2 of which were for malignant tumors. Acute food impaction should always be regarded as a symptom of esophageal disorders. In patients with esophageal cancer or other mediastinal tumors bolus impaction generally indicates an advanced tumor stage.

Key words

Food impaction of the esophagus Endoscopy Esophageal dysfunction Malignant tumors

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989