Journal of Molecular Evolution

, Volume 32, Issue 6, pp 511–520

Strand-specific nucleotide composition bias in echinoderm and vertebrate mitochondrial genomes

  • Shuichi Asakawa
  • Yoshinori Kumazawa
  • Takeyoshi Araki
  • Hyouta Himeno
  • Kin-ichiro Miura
  • Kimitsuna Watanabe
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02102653

Cite this article as:
Asakawa, S., Kumazawa, Y., Araki, T. et al. J Mol Evol (1991) 32: 511. doi:10.1007/BF02102653

Summary

The gene organization of starfish mitochondrial DNA is identical with that of the sea urchin counterpart except for a reported inversion of an approximately 4.6-kb segment containing two structural genes for NADH dehydrogenase subunits 1 and 2 (ND 1 and ND 2). When the codon usage of each structural gene in starfish, sea urchin, and vertebrate mitochondrial DNAs is examined, it is striking that codons ending in T and G are preferentially used more for heavy strand-encoded genes, including starfish ND 1 and ND 2, than for light strand-encoded genes, including sea urchin ND 1 and ND 2. On the contrary, codons ending in A and Care preferentially used for the light strand-encoded genes rather than for the heavy strand-encoded ones. Moreover, G-U base pairs are more frequently found in the possible secondary structures of heavy strandencoded tRNAs than in those of light strand-encoded tRNAs. These observations suggest the existence of a certain constraint operating on mitochondrial genomes from various animal phyla, which results in the accumulation of G and T on one strand, and A and C on the other.

Key words

Mitochondrial DNA Gene inversion Nucleotide composition bias Codon usage Starfish Sea urchin Echinoderm 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuichi Asakawa
    • 1
  • Yoshinori Kumazawa
    • 2
  • Takeyoshi Araki
    • 1
  • Hyouta Himeno
    • 3
  • Kin-ichiro Miura
    • 1
  • Kimitsuna Watanabe
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Industrial Chemistry, Faculty of EngineeringUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesFaculty of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohamaJapan
  3. 3.Institute of Space and Astronautical ScienceSagamihara, KanagawaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Molecular and Cell BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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