Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 299–304

Health habits and depression in adolescence

Authors

  • Stuart L. Kaplan
    • Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical Center
    • Health Sciences CenterState University of New York at Stony Brook
  • Michael Nussbaum
    • Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical Center
    • Health Sciences CenterState University of New York at Stony Brook
  • Phyllis Skomorowsky
    • Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical Center
  • I. Ronald Shenker
    • Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical Center
    • Health Sciences CenterState University of New York at Stony Brook
  • Patricia Ramsey
    • Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical Center
    • Quantitative Methods and Administrative Computer SystemsHofstra University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02087981

Cite this article as:
Kaplan, S.L., Nussbaum, M., Skomorowsky, P. et al. J Youth Adolescence (1980) 9: 299. doi:10.1007/BF02087981

Abstract

In a study of the relationship between health habits and depression, 80 high school students, selected on an availability basis, were administered a Health Behaviors Questionnaire (HBQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The HBQ and the BDI significantly correlated (r=0.43p<0.01). Those who smoked were more frequently depressed than those who did not (X2=10.5p<0.05), and those who used drugs other than marijuana were depressed more frequently than those who did not (X2=9.2p<0.01). Mildly overweight boys (overweight by more than 5% of their ideal weight) and mildly under-weight boys (underweight by more than 5% of their ideal weight) were more

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980