Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 41, Issue 11, pp 2248–2253

Impact of irritable bowel syndrome on quality of life

Authors

  • William E. Whitehead
    • Division of Digestive Diseases, CB# 7080University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Charles K. Burnett
    • Division of Digestive Diseases, CB# 7080University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Edwin W. CookIII
    • Division of Digestive Diseases, CB# 7080University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Edward Taub
    • Division of Digestive Diseases, CB# 7080University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
Intestinal Disorders, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Immunology, And Microbiology

DOI: 10.1007/BF02071408

Cite this article as:
Whitehead, W.E., Burnett, C.K., Cook, E.W. et al. Digest Dis Sci (1996) 41: 2248. doi:10.1007/BF02071408
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Abstract

The aims of this study were to determine the impact of irritable bowel syndrome on quality of life using a well-standardized measure, the SF-36, and to determine whether apparent impairments may be due to neuroticism. Undergraduate students with irritable bowel syndrome who had consulted a physician (41 females, 42 males), students with irritable bowel who had not consulted a physician (91 females, 74 males), and asymptomatic controls (52 females, 70 males) completed questionnaires on quality of life, neuroticism, and psychological distress. Patients showed greater impairment in quality of life than nonconsulters, who in turn showed greater impairment than controls. Neuroticism and psychological distress were correlated with all quality-of-life measures. However, when neuroticism and psychological distress were statistically partialed out, irritable bowel syndrome still had a significant negative impact. The SF-36 may be a useful outcome measure in treatment studies, but investigators will need to correct for confounding influences of neuroticism.

Key words

quality of lifeirritable bowel syndromeneuroticismpsychological distressoutcome
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996