Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 20, Issue 8, pp 1945–1954

Biologically active secondary metabolites of barley. IV. Hordenine production by different barley lines

  • John V. Lovett
  • Anne H. C. Hoult
  • Olaf Christen
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02066235

Cite this article as:
Lovett, J.V., Hoult, A.H.C. & Christen, O. J Chem Ecol (1994) 20: 1945. doi:10.1007/BF02066235

Abstract

Forty-three lines of barley, including ancestral (wild), landraces, Middle Eastern lines, and modern cultivars, were grown under two different sets of environmental conditions. Hordenine production in barley roots was determined at the one-leaf stage by HPLC analysis and, in two lines only, over a period of 35 days. Forty-two of the 43 lines produced significant amounts of hordenine, although there was no variation among groups. Middle Eastern lines had the highest production with 327 µg/g on a dry weight basis. Production was, however, determined more by environmental conditions during growth than by genetic factors. Hordenine production was up to seven times higher in plants grown under lower light intensities.

Key Words

HordeninegraminebarleyHordeum spp. geneticsstress

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • John V. Lovett
    • 1
  • Anne H. C. Hoult
    • 1
  • Olaf Christen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy and Soil ScienceUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia
  2. 2.Christian Albrechts UniversityKielGermany