Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 507–523

The “Raison D'être” of pyrrolizidine alkaloids inCynoglossum officinale: Deterrent effects against generalist herbivores

Authors

  • Nicole M. van Dam
    • Institute of Evolutionary and Ecological SciencesResearch Group Ecology of Plant-Animal Interactions
  • Lucienne W. M. Vuister
    • Institute of Evolutionary and Ecological SciencesResearch Group Ecology of Plant-Animal Interactions
  • Cora Bergshoeff
    • Institute of Evolutionary and Ecological SciencesResearch Group Ecology of Plant-Animal Interactions
  • Helene de Vos
    • Institute of Evolutionary and Ecological SciencesResearch Group Ecology of Plant-Animal Interactions
  • ED van Der Meijden
    • Institute of Evolutionary and Ecological SciencesResearch Group Ecology of Plant-Animal Interactions
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02033698

Cite this article as:
van Dam, N.M., Vuister, L.W.M., Bergshoeff, C. et al. J Chem Ecol (1995) 21: 507. doi:10.1007/BF02033698

Abstract

In this study we tested whether pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) ofCynoglossum officinale serve as antifeedants against herbivores. Total PA N-oxide extracts of the leaves significantly deterred feeding by generalist herbivores. Specialist herbivores did not discriminate between food with high and low PA levels. Three PAs fromC. officinale, heliosupine, echinatine, and 3′-acetylechinatine, equally deterred feeding by the polyphagous larvae ofSpodoptera exigua. Although the plants mainly contain PAs in their N-oxide form, reduced PAs deterred feeding byS. exigua more efficiently than PA N-oxides. On rosette plants, the monophagous weevilMogulones cruciger significantly consumed more of the youngest leaves, which had the highest PA level and the highest nitrogen percentage. Larvae ofEthmia bipunctella, which are oligophagous within the Boraginaceae, did not discriminate between leaves. All generalist herbivores tested significantly avoided the youngest leaves with the highest PA levels. In the field, the oldest leaves also were relatively more damaged by herbivores than the youngest leaves. It is hypothesized that the skewed distribution of PAs over the leaves of rosette plants reflects optimal defense distribution within the plant.

Key Words

Cynoglossum officinaleBoraginaceaepyrrolizidine alkaloidschemical defensespecialist herbivoresgeneralist herbivoresEthmia bipunctellaMogulones (Ceutorhynchus) crucigerSpodoptera exiguaHelix aspersaFrankliniella occidentalisLocusta migratoriaLyriomyza trifolii

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995