Neurosurgical Review

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 233–252

Positron emission tomography

  • Y. Lucas Yamamoto
  • Christopher J. Thompson
  • Mirko Diksic
  • Ernst Meyer
  • William H. Feindel
I. Positron emission tomography

DOI: 10.1007/BF01892905

Cite this article as:
Yamamoto, Y.L., Thompson, C.J., Diksic, M. et al. Neurosurg. Rev. (1984) 7: 233. doi:10.1007/BF01892905

Summary

One of the most exciting new techniques introduced in the last ten years is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitativein vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasivein vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18.

Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. This review analyses the most recent trends in imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology, and clinical applications of positron emission tomography.

Keywords

Clinical application imaging techniques methodology positron emission tomography radiochemistry 

Copyright information

© Walter de Gruyter & Co. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Lucas Yamamoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher J. Thompson
    • 1
  • Mirko Diksic
    • 1
  • Ernst Meyer
    • 1
  • William H. Feindel
    • 1
  1. 1.Montreal Neurological InstituteMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Neuroisotope LaboratoryMontreal Neurological InstituteMontrealCanada

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