Original article

Blut

, Volume 61, Issue 5, pp 314-316

First online:

Post-transfusion malaria in thalassaemia patients

  • N. J. ChoudhuryAffiliated withDepartment of Blood Transfusion and Immunohaematology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
  • , M. L. DubeyAffiliated withDepartment of Parasitology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
  • , J. G. JollyAffiliated withDepartment of Blood Transfusion and Immunohaematology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
  • , Anju KalraAffiliated withDepartment of Parasitology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
  • , R. C. MahajanAffiliated withDepartment of Parasitology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
  • , N. K. GangulyAffiliated withDepartment of Experimental Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research

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Summary

A total of 125 β-thalassaemia patients receiving repeated blood transfusions were screened by Giemsa stain, Acridine-orange stain and antigen detection for evidence of malaria infection on each visit. A total of 8 (6.4%) of the patients developed post-transfusion malaria (PMT) as confirmed by tracing the infected blood donors. A high incidence of PTM in thalassaemia patients appears to be due to the use of fresh blood and the high frequency of blood transfusions required by these patients. Antigen detection using monoclonal antibody was found to be more sensitive for diagnosis of PTM and for screening suspected donors than the conventional blood smear examination methods and is therefore recommended for routine blood donor screening to rule out malaria infection.

Key words

Transfusion malaria Thalassaemia Antigen detection