Osteoporosis International

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 89–99

The epidemiology of quantitative ultrasound: A review of the relationships with bone mass, osteoporosis and fracture risk

Authors

  • E. W. Gregg
    • Division of Primary Care Internal MedicineUniversity of Vermont, College of Medicine
    • Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Human GeneticsUniversity of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
  • A. M. Kriska
    • Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Human GeneticsUniversity of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
  • L. M. Salamone
    • Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Human GeneticsUniversity of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
  • M. M. Roberts
    • Department of Endocrinology and MetabolismUniversity of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine
  • S. J. Aderson
    • Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Human GeneticsUniversity of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
  • R. E. Ferrell
    • Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Human GeneticsUniversity of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
  • L. H. Kuller
    • Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Human GeneticsUniversity of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
  • J. A. Cauley
    • Departments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Human GeneticsUniversity of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01623682

Cite this article as:
Gregg, E.W., Kriska, A.M., Salamone, L.M. et al. Osteoporosis Int (1997) 7: 89. doi:10.1007/BF01623682

Abstract

Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a simple, inexpensive and non-invasive measure of bone which has been used in research settings for the prediction of osteoporosis. This review summarizes the current status of the epidemiology of QUS analysis, including its relationship with bone mineral density (BMD), risk of osteoporotic fracture and risk factors for osteoporosis. Although only moderately correlated with BMD, QUS appears to be as strong a predictor of osteoporotic fracture as BMD and may predict fracture independent of BMD. Risk factors for low QUS, including age, menopause, body composition and physical inactivity, seem to parallel those of low BMD. More longitudinal research is needed to confirm the clinical utility of QUS and more experimental and population-based studies are needed to determine whether the etiology of low QUS values is different from that of low bone mass.

Keywords

Bone qualityBroadband ultrasound attenuationEpidemiologyOsteoporosisQuantitative ultrasoundSpeed of sound

Copyright information

© European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation 1997