Journal of Clinical Monitoring

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 175–177

Absorption characteristics of human fetal hemoglobin at wavelengths used in pulse oximetry

Authors

  • Andrew P. Harris
    • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Applied Physics Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University
  • Michael J. Sendak
    • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Applied Physics Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University
  • Robert T. Donham
    • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Applied Physics Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University
  • Michael Thomas
    • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Applied Physics Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University
  • Donald Duncan
    • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Applied Physics Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF01621812

Cite this article as:
Harris, A.P., Sendak, M.J., Donham, R.T. et al. J Clin Monitor Comput (1988) 4: 175. doi:10.1007/BF01621812

Abstract

The absorption characteristics of fetal and adult human hemoglobin samples were determined for the range of 600 to 1,050 nm. Over this range, fetal hemoglobin absorption is nearly identical to that of adult hemoglobin. Since currently available two-wavelength pulse oximeters base their calculations of arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation on absorption at the wavelengths of 660 and 920 nm, we conclude that the accuracy of two-wavelength pulse oximetry previously demonstrated in adults can be extrapolated to infants with high concentrations of fetal hemoglobin.

Key words

Monitoring, pulse oximetry: neonatalBlood: hemoglobin, fetal

Copyright information

© Little, Brown and Company 1988