Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 15, Issue 5, pp 266–273

Clinical and biological significance of interleukin-10 plasma levels in patients with septic shock

Authors

  • A. Marchant
    • Department of Immunology, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • M. L. Alegre
    • Department of Intensive Care, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • A. Hakim
    • Department of Immunology, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • G. Piérard
    • Department of Immunology, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • G. Marécaux
    • Department of Intensive Care, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • G. Friedman
    • Department of Intensive Care, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • D. De Groote
    • Medgenix Research Group and Development
  • R. J. Kahn
    • Department of Intensive Care, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • J. L. Vincent
    • Department of Intensive Care, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
  • M. Goldman
    • Department of Immunology, Hôpital ErasmeUniversité Libre de Bruxelles
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF01540884

Cite this article as:
Marchant, A., Alegre, M.L., Hakim, A. et al. J Clin Immunol (1995) 15: 266. doi:10.1007/BF01540884

Abstract

Interleukin-10 is a potent macrophage-deactivating cytokine that inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor production. We determined the plasma levels of immunoreactive interleukin-10 in 16 patients with septic shock and in 11 patients with circulatory shock of nonseptic origin. In septic shock, interleukin-10 levels peaked during the first 24 h (median: 48 pg/ml) and decreased progressively till Day 5. In nonseptic shock, interleukin-10 plasma levels also increased during the first 24 h but to a lesser extent (median: 17 pg/ml). In septic shock patients, interleukin-10 plasma levels were positively correlated with tumor necrosis factor (r=0.8,p=0.01) and with parameters of shock severity including lactate levels (r=0.56, p<0.05) and correlated negatively with blood platelet counts (r=−0.65,p<0.05). The decreased production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 afterin vitro incubation of whole blood from septic shock patients with lipopolysaccharide was not influenced byin vitro neutralization of interleukin-10. We conclude that interleukin-10 is produced in patients with circulatory shock of septic and nonseptic origin and that the production of this anti-inflammatory cytokine during septic shock correlates positively with the intensity of the inflammatory response.

Key words

Septic shockinterleukin-10tumor necrosis factorlipopolysaccharidemonocyte
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995