Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 21, Issue 4, pp 471–485

Perceived attachments to parents and peers and psychological well-being in adolescence

Authors

  • Shyamala Nada Raja
    • Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Medical SchoolUniversity of Otago
  • Rob McGee
    • Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Medical SchoolUniversity of Otago
  • Warren R. Stanton
    • Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Medical SchoolUniversity of Otago
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01537898

Cite this article as:
Raja, S.N., McGee, R. & Stanton, W.R. J Youth Adolescence (1992) 21: 471. doi:10.1007/BF01537898

Abstract

This paper reports the findings from a study of 935 adolescents' perceived attachments to their parents and peers, and their psychological health and well-being. Perceived attachment to parents did not significantly differ between males and females. However, females scored significantly higher than males on a measure of attachment to peers. Also, relative to males, they had higher anxiety and depression scores, suggesting poorer psychological well-being. Overall, a lower perceived attachment to parents was significantly associated with lower scores on the measures of well-being. Adolescents who perceived high attachments to both their parents and peers had the highest scores on a measure of self-perceived strengths. In this study, adolescents' perceived attachment to peers did not appear to compensate for a low attachment to parents in regard to their mental ill-health. These findings suggest that high perceived attachment to parents may be a critical variable associated with psychological well-being in adolescence.

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992