Comparison of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during exercise in dominant and nondominant forearm

  • Mitsuru Saito
  • Hitoshi Watanabe
  • Tadaaki Mano
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01427050

Cite this article as:
Saito, M., Watanabe, H. & Mano, T. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. (1993) 66: 108. doi:10.1007/BF01427050

Summary

To determine whether or not muscle endurance training alters exercise-induced sympathetic nerve response, we recorded muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) microneurographically during forearm exercise and compared MSNA between dominant (D) and nondominant (ND) forearms of players of racket sports. Three kinds of forearm exercise were conducted on each side; static (SHG) and dynamic (DHG, at a rate of 1 Hz) handgrip exercise at a loading of 25°10 of maximal voluntary contraction until exhaustion, and 10-min submaximal dynamic handgrip (at a rate of 1 Hz) at an intensity of 0.9 W. Heart rate, ventilation and blood pressure were also monitored at rest and during SHG and DHG exercises. During the last minute of SHG exercise, MSNA burst rate had increased on average by 290 (SEM 46) % in D and 330 (SEM 46) % in ND, while during DHG it increased by 288 (SEM 38) % in D and 344 (SEM 36) % in ND, respectively. There were no significant differences in the MSNA responses between D and ND forearms in either exercise modes. Significant increases in heart rate, ventilation and blood pressure during the last minute of fatiguing SHG and DHG were observed, but there were no significant differences between the two forearms. During submaximal DHG, while MSNA increased significantly above control values in both D and ND, the MSNA response was less in D than that in ND forearm. The results would suggest that exercise-induced MSNA responsiveness is influenced little by muscle endurance training but the intensity of response may be due to the magnitude of metaboreceptor stimulation in the exercising muscle.

Key words

Endurance training Forearm exercise Muscle sympathetic nerve activity Somatosympathetic reflex Racket sports 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mitsuru Saito
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Watanabe
    • 2
  • Tadaaki Mano
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Applied PhysiologyToyota Technological Institute 2-12NagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Research Institute of Environmental MedicineNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan

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