Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 283–293

Family preservation using multisystemic treatment: Long-term follow-up to a clinical trial with serious juvenile offenders

  • Scott W. Henggeler
  • Gary B. Melton
  • Linda A. Smith
  • Sonja K. Schoenwald
  • Jerome H. Hanley
Regular Papers

DOI: 10.1007/BF01321226

Cite this article as:
Henggeler, S.W., Melton, G.B., Smith, L.A. et al. J Child Fam Stud (1993) 2: 283. doi:10.1007/BF01321226

Abstract

In a randomized clinical trial, multisystemic family preservation was shown to significantly reduce rates of criminal activity and incarceration in a sample of 84 serious juvenile offenders and their multi-need families. In the current study, archival records were searched for re-arrest an average of 2.4 years post-referral. Survival analysis showed that youths who received multisystemic family preservation were less likely to be re-arrested than were youths who had received usual services. Such results represent the first controlled demonstration that family preservation, when delivered via a clearly specified treatment model, has lasting effects with serious juvenile offenders. Implications for family preservation and juvenile justice research are discussed.

Key words

family preservation delinquency treatment family treatment home-based treatment juvenile justice 

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott W. Henggeler
    • 4
  • Gary B. Melton
    • 1
  • Linda A. Smith
    • 2
  • Sonja K. Schoenwald
    • 4
  • Jerome H. Hanley
    • 3
  1. 1.Center on Children, Families, and the LawUniversity of NebraskaLincoln
  2. 2.Piedmont Center for Mental HealthSimpsonville
  3. 3.Division of Children, Adolescents, and their FamiliesSouth Carolina Department of Mental HealthColumbia
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharleston