Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 31, Issue 12, pp 1313–1316

Lactose malabsorption and intolerance in Italians

Clinical implications

Authors

  • A. Bozzani
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
  • R. Penagini
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
  • P. Velio
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
  • G. Camboni
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
  • A. Corbellini
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
  • M. Quatrini
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
  • D. Conte
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
  • P. A. Bianchi
    • Cattedra di Patologia Medica III, Istituto di Clinica Medica IUniversity of Milan
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF01299809

Cite this article as:
Bozzani, A., Penagini, R., Velio, P. et al. Digest Dis Sci (1986) 31: 1313. doi:10.1007/BF01299809

Abstract

Lactose malabsorption was assessed by the hydrogen breath test in 40 Italian patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 42 controls without abdominal disturbances. Sixty-five percent of patients were “low milk consumers” (0–250 ml milk per day) compared with 38% of controls (P<0.02). Lactose loads of 25 and 50 g caused malabsorption in 82.5 and 87.5% patients and in 55 and 62% controls, respectively (patients vs controlsP<0.02). Malabsorption was more frequent in the “low milk consumers” group (P<0.05). During a four-month lactose-free diet as the only treatment 7.5% of patients became symptomfree (and remained so for a further eight-month diet), 52.5% improved, and 40% showed no change.

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986