Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology

, Volume 122, Issue 5, pp 283–288

Human hepatitis B virus and hepatocellular carcinoma I. Experimental infection of tree shrews with hepatitis B virus

Authors

  • Rui Qi Yan
    • Department of PathologyGuangxi Institute for Research on Cancer
    • Department of Pathology, Cancer InstituteSun Yat-sen University of Medical Sciences
  • Jian Jia Su
    • Department of PathologyGuangxi Institute for Research on Cancer
  • Ding Rui Huang
    • Department of PathologyGuangxi Institute for Research on Cancer
  • You Chuan Gan
    • Department of PathologyGuangxi Institute for Research on Cancer
  • Chun Yang
    • Department of PathologyGuangxi Institute for Research on Cancer
  • Gua Hau Huang
    • Department of PathologyGuangxi Institute for Research on Cancer
Original Paper Experimental Oncology

DOI: 10.1007/BF01261404

Cite this article as:
Yan, R.Q., Su, J.J., Huang, D.R. et al. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol (1996) 122: 283. doi:10.1007/BF01261404

Abstract

Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinenesis) can be experimentally infected with human hepatitis B virus (HBV) by inoculation with human serum positive for HBV, the experimental infection rate being 55.21%. Successive infections have been passed through five generations among the tree shrews inoculated with HBV-positive sera from the infected animals, the average infection rate being 94.0%. The experimental infection of tree shrews with HBV may be prevented by immunization with hepatitis B vaccine, the protection rate being 88.89%. Standard serum containing HBV at 108 CID (chimpanzee infection dose)/ml, was diluted 10−6, 10−7, 10−8, 10−9, and 10−10 and produced infection rates of 80.0%, 88.8%, 66.7%, 55.6% and 42.9% respectively. Thus the CID50 in tree shrews may reach a dilution of 10−9, which shows that tree shrews are sensitive to HBV infection. These results successfully establish tree shrews as a reliable and useful animal model for research on HBV infection and its relation to hepatocarcinogenesis.

Key words

Hepatitis B virusInfection, experimentalTree shrewsHB vaccine

Abbreviations

HCC

Hepatocellular carcinoma

HBV

human hepatitis B virus

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996