Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 271–277

Amphetamine and 2-phenylethylamine in post-mortem Parkinsonian brain after (-)deprenyl administration

Authors

  • G. P. Reynolds
    • Department of Chemical Pathology, Bernhard Baron Memorial Research LaboratoriesQueen Charlotte's Hospital
  • P. Riederer
    • Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for Clinical NeurobiologyLainz-Hospital
  • M. Sandler
    • Department of Chemical Pathology, Bernhard Baron Memorial Research LaboratoriesQueen Charlotte's Hospital
  • K. Jellinger
    • Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for Clinical NeurobiologyLainz-Hospital
  • D. Seemann
    • Department of NeurologyLainz-Geriatric Hospital
Short Communications

DOI: 10.1007/BF01246964

Cite this article as:
Reynolds, G.P., Riederer, P., Sandler, M. et al. J. Neural Transmission (1978) 43: 271. doi:10.1007/BF01246964

Summary

Deprenyl is an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase type B, the enzyme responsible for 2-phenylethylamine oxidation, and is used in conjunction with L-Dopa therapy in Parkinson's disease. Post-mortem studies in human brain tissue have shown that after (-)deprenyl administration to parkinsonian patients amphetamine is present in concentrations up to 56 ng/g. It also could be shown that phenylethylamine concentrations are substantially increased in such patients.

Phenylethylamine and amphetamine have been investigated using a gas chromatographie technique.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978