Synthese

, Volume 101, Issue 3, pp 401–431

Doing without representing?

  • Andy Clark
  • Josefa Toribio
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01063896

Cite this article as:
Clark, A. & Toribio, J. Synthese (1994) 101: 401. doi:10.1007/BF01063896

Abstract

Connectionism and classicism, it generally appears, have at least this much in common: both place some notion of internal representation at the heart of a scientific study of mind. In recent years, however, a much more radical view has gained increasing popularity. This view calls into question the commitment to internal representation itself. More strikingly still, this new wave of anti-representationalism is rooted not in ‘armchair’ theorizing but in practical attempts to model and understand intelligent, adaptive behavior. In this paper we first present, and then critically assess, a variety of recent anti-representationalist treatments. We suggest that so far, at least, the sceptical rhetoric outpaces both evidence and argument. Some probable causes of this premature scepticism are isolated. Nonetheless, the anti-representationalist challenge is shown to be both important and progressive insofar as it forces us to see beyond the bare representational/non-representational dichotomy and to recognize instead a rich continuum of degrees and types of representationality.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andy Clark
    • 1
  • Josefa Toribio
    • 1
  1. 1.Philosophy DepartmentPhilosophy/Neuroscience/Psychology Program Washington University in St. LouisSt. LouisUSA