Pesticides and honey bees: Nectar and pollen contamination in alfalfa treated with dimethoate

  • Roy J. Barker
  • Yolanda Lehner
  • Michael R. Kunzmann
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01055368

Cite this article as:
Barker, R.J., Lehner, Y. & Kunzmann, M.R. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. (1980) 9: 125. doi:10.1007/BF01055368

Abstract

Medicago sativa L. (Leguminosae) sprayed withO,O-dimethylS-(N-methylcarbamoylmethyl) phosphorodithioate (dimethoate) had only 0.5 ppm of dimethoate in pollen one day later, but 3 ppm in nectar one week later, and 1 ppm in nectar two weeks later. As little as 1 ppm added to syrup fed to caged workers ofApis mellifera L. (Apidae) inhibited cholinesterase and reduced survival. Bees given a choice between treated and untreated syrups showed no preference; this suggests that the levels of dimethoate found in nectar are toxic and not repellent.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy J. Barker
    • 2
  • Yolanda Lehner
    • 2
  • Michael R. Kunzmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Tucson
  2. 2.Carl T. Hayden Bee Research CenterU.S. Department of AgricultureTucson