Neurochemical Research

, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp 1389–1405

Purification of a calcium-activated neutral proteinase from bovine brain

  • Naren L. Banik
  • Edward L. Hogan
  • Mark G. Jenkins
  • J. Ken McDonald
  • Walter W. McAlhaney
  • Mark B. Sostek
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF00964996

Cite this article as:
Banik, N.L., Hogan, E.L., Jenkins, M.G. et al. Neurochem Res (1983) 8: 1389. doi:10.1007/BF00964996

Abstract

A calcium-activated neutral proteinase (CANP) resolved into three components has been partially purified from bovine brain. The method of isolation has resulted in 22,000, 7,100, and 8,000-fold purification for CANP I, II and III respectively. All three fractions require Ca2+ for activation. The characterization of the purified CANP I has shown that it is activated by 250 μM Ca2+ and the enzyme loses its activity when incubated in the presence of Ca2+ without substrate. Mg2+ is ineffective. The enzyme degrades neurofilament triplet proteins, tubulin and casein efficiently. The myelin basic protein is hydrolyzed after longer incubation. Bovine serum albumin and histones are unaffected. The enzyme is active at pH 5.5 to 9.0 with optimum between pH 7.5 and 8.5. It has a Km of 1.8×10−7 M for the 69,000 dalton neurofilament protein. The enzyme is inhibited by sulphydryl blocking reagents and also by EGTA, leupeptin and E-64c. The SDS-PAGE analysis of the enzyme fractions has shown a major band at 66–68,000 daltons and two minor bands at 60,000 and 48–50,000 daltons for CANP I; a major band at 48–50,000 daltons and a minor band at 30–32,000 daltons for CANP II and a predominant doublet at 30–32,000 daltons with a minor band at 48–50,000 daltons for CANP III. The degradation of neurofilament proteins suggests that the CANP(s) may be involved in the turnover of these proteins.

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naren L. Banik
    • 1
  • Edward L. Hogan
    • 1
  • Mark G. Jenkins
    • 1
  • J. Ken McDonald
    • 1
  • Walter W. McAlhaney
    • 1
  • Mark B. Sostek
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Neurology and BiochemistryMedical University of South CarolinaCharleston