Inflammation

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 361–371

Analgesic and antiinflammatory activity of constituents ofCannabis sativa L.

  • E. A. Formukong
  • A. T. Evans
  • F. J. Evans
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF00915771

Cite this article as:
Formukong, E.A., Evans, A.T. & Evans, F.J. Inflammation (1988) 12: 361. doi:10.1007/BF00915771

Abstract

Two extacts ofCannabis sativa herb, one being cannabinoid-free (ethanol) and the other containing the cannabinoids (petroleum), were shown to inhibit PBQ-induced writhing in mouse when given orally and also to antagonize tetradecanoyl-phorbol acetate (TPA) -induced erythema of mouse skin when applied topically. With the exception of cannabinol (CBN) and δ1-tetrahydrocannabinol (δ1-THC), the cannabinoids and olivetol (their biosynthetic precursor) demonstrated activity in the PBQ test exhibiting their maximal effect at doses of about 100Μg/kg. δ1-THC only became maximally effective in doses of 10 mg/kg. This higher dose corresponded to that which induced catalepsy and is indicative of a central action. CBN demonstrated little activity and even at doses in excess of 10 mg/kg could only produce a 40% inhibition of PBQ-induced writhing. Cannabidiol (CBD) was the most effective of the cannabinoids at doses of 100Μg/kg. Doses of cannabinoids that were effective in the analgesic test orally were used topically to antagonize TPA-induced erythema of skin. The fact that δ1-THC and CBN were the least effective in this test suggests a structural relationship between analgesic activity and antiin-flammatory activity among the cannabinoids related to their peripheral actions and separate from the central effects of δ1-THC.

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Formukong
    • 1
  • A. T. Evans
    • 1
  • F. J. Evans
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacognosy, The School of PharmacyUniversity of LondonLondonEngland

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