Original Article

Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 159-162

Mineral excretion following furosemide compared with bumetanide therapy in premature infants

  • Seetha ShankaranAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of MedicineChildren's Hospital of MichiganGrace Hospital
  • , Keh-chyang LiangAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of MedicineGrace Hospital
  • , Nestor IlaganAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of MedicineGrace Hospital
  • , Larry FleischmannAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of MedicineChildren's Hospital of Michigan

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Abstract

Mineral excretion following single doses of furosemide were compared with bumetanide in a random cross-over trial in 17 premature infants. The mean birth-weight and gestational age were 889±85 g and 27±2 weeks. Following furosemide therapy, significantly higher chloride losses and urine volumes were noted in the first 8-h period compared with the second or third 8-h periods. Following bumetanide therapy, sodium, calcium, and chloride losses and urine volumes were significantly higher in the first 8 h compared with the second or third 8-h periods. Hourly sodium and chloride losses were significantly lower following bumetanide than furosemide during the first two 8-h periods. During the final 8-h period sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium losses were significantly lower following bumetanide than following furosemide. Sodium loss per urine volume was lower with bumetanide than furosemide but calcium loss tended to be higher. Hence, bumetanide does not appear to be a calciumsparing diuretic following single-dose therapy.

Key words

Mineral excretion Bumetanide Furosemide Premature infants