Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 391–401

The medical interview satisfaction scale: Development of a scale to measure patient perceptions of physician behavior

Authors

  • Matthew H. Wolf
    • Departments of Psychology, Medicine, and EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina
  • Samuel M. Putnam
    • Departments of Psychology, Medicine, and EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina
  • Sherman A. James
    • Departments of Psychology, Medicine, and EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina
  • William B. Stiles
    • Departments of Psychology, Medicine, and EpidemiologyUniversity of North Carolina
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00846695

Cite this article as:
Wolf, M.H., Putnam, S.M., James, S.A. et al. J Behav Med (1978) 1: 391. doi:10.1007/BF00846695

Abstract

Patient satisfaction is a variable of increasing interest to researchers, clinicians, and medical educators. Of several studies reviewed, only a few have shown evidence of careful methodology. Most surveys have focused on general evaluations of doctors and/or health care services or of a particular facility. The present article reports the development of a scale to measure patient satisfaction with an encounter with a physician or other primary care provider. Methods of item generation and pretesting are detailed. The overall reliability of the scale (Cronbach's coefficientα) is 0.93. The distribution of satisfaction scores is broader than that reported for other scales and approaches the normal in shape. Clinical and research applications of the scale are suggested.

Key words

patient satisfaction with physicianMedical Interview Satisfaction Scalephysician-patient relationships
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978