Space Science Reviews

, Volume 71, Issue 1, pp 55–77

SWE, a comprehensive plasma instrument for the WIND spacecraft

Authors

  • K. W. Ogilvie
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • D. J. Chornay
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • R. J. Fritzenreiter
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • F. Hunsaker
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • J. Keller
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • J. Lobell
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • G. Miller
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • J. D. Scudder
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • E. C. SittlerJr.
    • Interplanetary Physics BranchGoddard Space Flight Center
  • R. B. Torbert
    • Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for Study of Earth, Oceans, and SpaceUniversity of New Hampshire
  • D. Bodet
    • Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for Study of Earth, Oceans, and SpaceUniversity of New Hampshire
  • G. Needell
    • Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for Study of Earth, Oceans, and SpaceUniversity of New Hampshire
  • A. J. Lazarus
    • Center for Space ResearchMassachusetts Institute of Technology
  • J. T. Steinberg
    • Center for Space ResearchMassachusetts Institute of Technology
  • J. H. Tappan
    • Center for Space ResearchMassachusetts Institute of Technology
  • A. Mavretic
    • Microelectronics Research LaboratoryBoston University
  • E. Gergin
    • Microelectronics Research LaboratoryBoston University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00751326

Cite this article as:
Ogilvie, K.W., Chornay, D.J., Fritzenreiter, R.J. et al. Space Sci Rev (1995) 71: 55. doi:10.1007/BF00751326

Abstract

The Solar Wind Experiment (SWE) on the WIND spacecraft is a comprehensive, integrated set of sensors which is designed to investigate outstanding problems in solar wind physics. It consists of two Faraday cup (FC) sensors; a vector electron and ion spectrometer (VEIS); a strahl sensor, which is especially configured to study the electron ‘strahl’ close to the magnetic field direction; and an on-board calibration system. The energy/charge range of the Faraday cups is 150 V to 8 kV, and that of the VEIS is 7 V to 24.8 kV. The time resolution depends on the operational mode used, but can be of the order of a few seconds for 3-D measurements. ‘Key parameters’ which broadly characterize the solar wind positive ion velocity distribution function will be made available rapidly from the GGS Central Data Handling Facility.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995