Solar Physics

, Volume 162, Issue 1, pp 233–290

The Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer for the solar and heliospheric observatory

  • R. A. Harrison
  • E. C. Sawyer
  • M. K. Carter
  • A. M. Cruise
  • R. M. Cutler
  • A. Fludra
  • R. W. Hayes
  • B. J. Kent
  • J. Lang
  • D. J. Parker
  • J. Payne
  • C. D. Pike
  • S. C. Peskett
  • A. G. Richards
  • J. L. Gulhane
  • K. Norman
  • A. A. Breeveld
  • E. R. Breeveld
  • K. F. Al Janabi
  • A. J. Mccalden
  • J. H. Parkinson
  • D. G. Self
  • P. D. Thomas
  • A. I. Poland
  • R. J. Thomas
  • W. T. Thompson
  • O. Kjeldseth-Moe
  • P. Brekke
  • J. Karud
  • P. Maltby
  • B. Aschenbach
  • H. Bräuninger
  • M. Kühne
  • J. Hollandt
  • O. H. W. Siegmund
  • M. C. E. Huber
  • A. H. Gabriel
  • H. E. Mason
  • B. J. I. Bromage
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00733431

Cite this article as:
Harrison, R.A., Sawyer, E.C., Carter, M.K. et al. Sol Phys (1995) 162: 233. doi:10.1007/BF00733431

Abstract

The Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer is designed to probe the solar atmosphere through the detection of spectral emission lines in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range 150 – 800 Å. By observing the intensities of selected lines and line profiles, we may derive temperature, density, flow and abundance information for the plasmas in the solar atmosphere. Spatial and temporal resolutions of down to a few arcseconds and seconds, respectively, allow such studies to be made within the fine-scale structure of the solar corona. Futhermore, coverage of large wavelength bands provides the capability for simultaneously observing the properties of plasmas across the wide temperature ranges of the solar atmosphere.

Key words

Solar Atmosphere Extreme UV Spectroscopy 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Harrison
    • 1
  • E. C. Sawyer
    • 1
  • M. K. Carter
    • 1
  • A. M. Cruise
    • 1
  • R. M. Cutler
    • 1
  • A. Fludra
    • 1
  • R. W. Hayes
    • 1
  • B. J. Kent
    • 1
  • J. Lang
    • 1
  • D. J. Parker
    • 1
  • J. Payne
    • 1
  • C. D. Pike
    • 1
  • S. C. Peskett
    • 1
  • A. G. Richards
    • 1
  • J. L. Gulhane
    • 2
  • K. Norman
    • 2
  • A. A. Breeveld
    • 2
  • E. R. Breeveld
    • 2
  • K. F. Al Janabi
    • 2
  • A. J. Mccalden
    • 2
  • J. H. Parkinson
    • 2
  • D. G. Self
    • 2
  • P. D. Thomas
    • 2
  • A. I. Poland
    • 3
  • R. J. Thomas
    • 3
  • W. T. Thompson
    • 3
  • O. Kjeldseth-Moe
    • 4
  • P. Brekke
    • 4
  • J. Karud
    • 4
  • P. Maltby
    • 4
  • B. Aschenbach
    • 5
  • H. Bräuninger
    • 5
  • M. Kühne
    • 6
  • J. Hollandt
    • 6
  • O. H. W. Siegmund
    • 7
  • M. C. E. Huber
    • 8
  • A. H. Gabriel
    • 9
  • H. E. Mason
    • 10
  • B. J. I. Bromage
    • 11
  1. 1.Space Science Dept.Rutherford Appleton LaboratoryChilton, Didcot OxfordshireUK
  2. 2.Mullard Space Science LaboratoryUniversity College LondonDorking, SurreyUK
  3. 3.NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 682GreenbeltUSA
  4. 4.Institute of Theroetical AstrophysicsUniversity of OsloBlindernOsloNorway
  5. 5.Max- Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische PhysikGarchingGermany
  6. 6.Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Inst. BerlinBerlin 10Germany
  7. 7.Experimental Astrophysics Group, Space Sciences LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  8. 8.ESA, Space Science Dept.ESTECNoordwijkThe Netherlands
  9. 9.Inst. d'Astrophysique SpatialeUniversité Paris XIOrsay CedexFrance
  10. 10.Dept. Applied Mathematics and Theoretical PhysicsUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  11. 11.Dept. of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of Central LancashireUK

Personalised recommendations