Annals of Hematology

, Volume 72, Issue 1, pp 35–39

Risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission by anti-HCV-negative blood components in Austria and Germany

Authors

  • J. Riggert
    • Department of Transfusion Medicine, and Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Göttingen
  • D. W. M. Schwartz
    • University Clinic for Blood Group Serology and Transfusion Medicine and Austrian Red Cross Blood Donation Center for Vienna, Lower Austria and BurgenlandUniversity of Vienna
  • A. Uy
    • Department of Transfusion Medicine, and Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Göttingen
  • G. Simson
    • Department of Transfusion Medicine, and Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Göttingen
  • F. Jelinek
    • University Clinic for Blood Group Serology and Transfusion Medicine and Austrian Red Cross Blood Donation Center for Vienna, Lower Austria and BurgenlandUniversity of Vienna
  • H. Fabritz
    • Department of Transfusion Medicine, and Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Göttingen
  • W. R. Mayr
    • University Clinic for Blood Group Serology and Transfusion Medicine and Austrian Red Cross Blood Donation Center for Vienna, Lower Austria and BurgenlandUniversity of Vienna
  • M. Köhler
    • Department of Transfusion Medicine, and Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Göttingen
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00663014

Cite this article as:
Riggert, J., Schwartz, D.W.M., Uy, A. et al. Ann Hematol (1996) 72: 35. doi:10.1007/BF00663014

Abstract

In order to estimate the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted HCV infection, we have analyzed data from two transfusion centers in Austria (Vienna) and Germany (G6ttingen) from 1990 to 1995. In Vienna, the seroprevalence (RIBA-confirmed third-generation anti-HCV tests) was 0.28% in first-time donors (FTD) and the incidence of seroconversion in repeat donors (RD) was 0.049 (per 100 person years) from 1994 to 1995. In Göttingen, the prevalence of a PCR-confirmed positive third-generation anti-HCV test was 0.22% in FTDs and the incidence was 0.093 (per 100 person years). A continuous decline of the rate of anti-HCV-positive donations and donors was observed with first- and second-generation anti-HCV tests in the years 1990–1994. The introduction of the third-generation anti-HCV test resulted in increased numbers of anti-HCV positive repeat donors, mainly due to false-positive results. Only 9% of anti-HCV-positive repeat donors were either PCR positive or RIBA positive or indeterminate. Based on a mathematical model which takes (a) the window period, (b) the false-negative rate of anti-HCV tests, and (c) human and operational errors into consideration, we have calculated the residual risk of HCV infection. We used a window period of 74 days, a sensitivity of 98%, and an error rate of 0.1%. The residual risk (for third-generation anti-HCV test-negative blood components) was calculated to be 1:9000 (95% confidence interval 1:16390–1:6210) and 1:4800 (95% confidence interval 1:40000–1:1320) for Vienna and Göttingen, respectively, in 1994 and 1995. Since this conservative approach does not take the impact of ALAT screening into account, the actual risk is probably lower.

Key words

HCVRiskBlood transfusionPCR RIBAIncidence Prevalence

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996