Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 52, Issue 6, pp 425–433

Life-style and different fracture prevalence: A cross-sectional comparative population-based study

Authors

  • Brynjólfur Jónsson
    • Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
    • Department of Community Health Sciences, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
  • Per Gärdsell
    • Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
    • Department of Community Health Sciences, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
  • Olof Johnell
    • Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
    • Department of Community Health Sciences, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
  • Ingemar Sernbo
    • Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
    • Department of Community Health Sciences, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
  • Bo Gullberg
    • Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
    • Department of Community Health Sciences, Malmö General HospitalUniversity of Lund
Clinical Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF00571331

Cite this article as:
Jónsson, B., Gärdsell, P., Johnell, O. et al. Calcif Tissue Int (1993) 52: 425. doi:10.1007/BF00571331

Summary

In order to explain the higher prevalence of fractures in urban compared with rural areas, 782 residents in the city of Malmö, Sweden and 486 inhabitants from the nearby rural municipality of Sjöbo were invited to participate in an sex- and age-matched cross-sectional study on life-style differences; 73 and 80% respectively responded. Responders answered a questionnaire on medical and social background and were interviewed on past and present physical activity. The men and women of the rural area were found to be significantly more active physically at work and during spare time. Housing was larger in the rural area. For women, these differences are decreasing in the younger age groups. Bone mass was found to be correlated to heavier work load for men. Other life-style variable such as dairy calcium intake, coffee drinking, estrogen medication, and morbidity, could not explain this difference. Higher prevalence of fractures in the city could therefore be explained by physicall less active life-style.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993