Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 85, Issue 2, pp 535–540

Change in the acid-base status of an appalachian mountain catchment following forest defoliation by the gypsy moth

  • J. R. Webb
  • B. J. Cosby
  • F. A. DevineyJr.
  • K. N. Eshleman
  • J. N. Galloway
Part II Natural Versus Anthropogenic Acidification

DOI: 10.1007/BF00476884

Cite this article as:
Webb, J.R., Cosby, B.J., Deviney, F.A. et al. Water Air Soil Pollut (1995) 85: 535. doi:10.1007/BF00476884

Abstract

Infestation by the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) can alter biogeochemical conditions in affected catchments. Stream-water concentration data obtained over the period of 1980–1993 for White Oak Run, a stream in Shenandoah National Park, Va., indicate that change in catchment acid-base status is associated with forest defoliation by the moth larva. Stream-water concentration changes following defoliation included increasing concentrations of strong-acid anions, base-cations, and hydrogen ion, as well as decreasing concentrations of acid-neutralization capacity (ANC) and sulfate. The largest change was in the concentration of nitrate; annual discharge-weighted mean concentrations increased from predefoliation levels consistently less than 5 μeq L−1 to postdefoliation levels greater than 50 μeq L−1. An intensification of acidification was indicated by record-high hydrogen ion concentrations and record-low ANC concentrations. The long-term biogeochemical implications of the infestation are uncertain due to the nonlinearity of the observed responses and unknown patterns of recovery and recurrence.

Key words

Gypsy moth Forest defoliation Stream-water composition Stream-water acidification 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Webb
    • 1
  • B. J. Cosby
    • 1
  • F. A. DevineyJr.
    • 1
  • K. N. Eshleman
    • 1
  • J. N. Galloway
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental SciencesUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Center for Environmental and esturine StudiesUniversity of Maryland SystemsFrostburg

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