Psychopharmacology

, Volume 78, Issue 4, pp 305–308

Nicotine from cigarette smoking increases circulating levels of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin in male chronic smokers

Authors

  • J. N. Wilkins
    • Clinical Pyschopharmacology UnitVAMedical Center
    • Department of PsychiatryUCLA School of Medicine
  • H. E. Carlson
    • Veterans Administration Medical Center
    • Department of MedicineUCLA School of Medicine
  • H. Van Vunakis
    • Department of BiochemistryBrandeis University
  • M. A. Hill
    • Clinical Pyschopharmacology UnitVAMedical Center
    • Department of BiomathematicsUCLA School of Medicine
  • E. Gritz
    • Clinical Pyschopharmacology UnitVAMedical Center
    • Department of PsychiatryUCLA School of Medicine
  • M. E. Jarvik
    • Clinical Pyschopharmacology UnitVAMedical Center
    • Department of PsychiatryUCLA School of Medicine
    • Department of PharmacologyUCLA School of Medicine
Original Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF00433730

Cite this article as:
Wilkins, J.N., Carlson, H.E., Van Vunakis, H. et al. Psychopharmacology (1982) 78: 305. doi:10.1007/BF00433730

Abstract

Results of this study indicate that nicotine from cigarette smoking increases circulating levels of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin in male chronic smokers. Previous studies have not addressed the question of whether the stimulus for smoking-related hormone release is the ‘stress’ of smoking or a pharmacologic action of nicotine and other tobacco substrates. Nicotine exposure is controlled in this study by allowing each subject to smoke only two 2.0 mg nicotine cigarettes during one experimental session and two 0.2 mg nicotine cigarettes in another session. Plasma levels of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin for the higher nicotine session were found to be significantly elevated over those for the low-nicotine session, indicating that nicotine itself plays a predominate role in smoking-induced hormone increases. All hormone levels for the 2.0 mg nicotine session had not returned to baseline 60 min after smoking.

Key words

NicotineCigarette smokingCortisolGrowth homoneProlactinHeart rate
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982