, Volume 3, Issue 1-4, pp 77-84

The near infrared camera on the W.M. Keck telescope

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Abstract

The near infrared camera (NIRC) was used for a science demonstration run on the Keck telescope during 16–24 March 1993. The camera used a 256×256 InSb array manufactured by Santa Barbara Research Corporation. Observations were obtained using narrowband and broad band filters from 1 to 2.4 microns, and grisms with a spectral resolution of 0.6 percent in the J, H and K atmospheric windows. The instrument was fully background limited over the entire wavelength range. The sky background was quite low, reaching 14.3 mag/square arc sec in the broadband K s filter. The image quality of the camera + telescope was excellent, being seeing limited in the range 0.5″–0.9″.

The science demonstration observations of the NIRC on the Keck Telescope included observations of the most distant galaxy known, 4C41.17 at a redshift z=3.8 and the most luminous object known, the IRAS source FSC10214+4724 at a redshift z=2.29. Observations of the radio galaxy address the problem of the alignment effect in high redshift radio galaxies as well as the environments of such systems. FSC10214+4724 appears to be a merging galaxy that is at least 5×108 years old.

Based on observations obtained at the W.M.Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the California Institute of Technology and the University of California
The W.M. Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology and the University of California. It was made possible by the generous gift of the W.M. Keck foundation and the support of its president, Howard Keck.