Psychopharmacology

, Volume 79, Issue 2, pp 137–141

Profile of acute tolerance to three sedative anxiolytics

Authors

  • Everett H. EllinwoodJr.
    • Behavioral Neuropharmacology Section, Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical Center
  • Markku Linnoila
    • Behavioral Neuropharmacology Section, Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical Center
  • Martha E. Easler
    • Behavioral Neuropharmacology Section, Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical Center
  • David W. Molter
    • Behavioral Neuropharmacology Section, Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical Center
Original Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF00427800

Cite this article as:
Ellinwood, E.H., Linnoila, M., Easler, M.E. et al. Psychopharmacology (1983) 79: 137. doi:10.1007/BF00427800

Abstract

Acute tolerance, defined as a decreasing drug effect relative to drug-plasma levels (DPL) over a period of minutes to a few hours, is pronounced following single doses of diazepam or pentobarbital. Both of these lipid-soluble drugs produce an early peak behavioral impairment and subsequent rapid recovery component that is followed by a much slower blood-drug rise time. These pronounced early peak effects were not shared by alcohol, and contribute significantly to the lack of correlation between impairment and DPL.

Key words

Acute tolerancePeak impairmentSedative anxiolyticsPlasma concentration
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983