Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 55, Issue 3, pp 198–203

Androgen resistance and deficiency have different effects on the growing skeleton of the rat

  • D. Vanderschueren
  • E. Van Herck
  • P. Geusens
  • A. Suiker
  • W. Visser
  • K. Chung
  • R. Bouillon
Laboratory Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF00425875

Cite this article as:
Vanderschueren, D., Van Herck, E., Geusens, P. et al. Calcif Tissue Int (1994) 55: 198. doi:10.1007/BF00425875

Abstract

Mature male, female, and androgen-resistant testicular feminized (Tfm) male rats of the same strain were sacrificed at the age of 120 days. Young male and Tfm rats were orchidectomized (orch) at 1 month of age and sacrificed at 120 days. The right femora were dissected, cleaned, defatted, and scanned with the Hologic QDR-1000. Orch and Tfm rats had similar body weights that were intermediate between body weights of their normal male and female littermates. Serum IGF-I concentrations were lowest in Tfm rats; IGF-1 concentrations in orch rats were not lower than in males. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry yielded the following results: Total femoral mass and area were lower in female, Tfm rats and in both orch groups compared with intact male rats. Femoral bone density was, however, only decreased in orch rats. Bone density measured in an area containing only cortical bone was not different between groups. However, the density was lower in orch rats in an area containing both cancellous and cortical bone. This finding is consistent with a ±50% decrease of cancellous bone volume in orch rats compared with all other groups at the proximal tibial metaphysis (an area containing mainly cancellous bone). These data show that Tfm rats, despite having lower IGF-I levels in serum, low body weight, and decreased femoral areas, manage—in contrast with orchidectomized rats—to maintain similar trabecular bone densities and volumes during growth. We conclude that trabecular bone densities can be preserved in androgen-resistant male rats independent of bone or body growth velocity or IGF-I secretion. We postulate that the modest increase of estrogen concentration in this animals and/or in situ aromatization may be responsible for the maintenance of the cancellous bone.

Key words

GrowthAndrogensDual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Vanderschueren
    • 1
  • E. Van Herck
    • 1
  • P. Geusens
    • 2
  • A. Suiker
    • 3
  • W. Visser
    • 3
  • K. Chung
    • 4
  • R. Bouillon
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratorium voor Experimentele Geneeskunde en EndocrinologieKatholieke Universiteit LeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Reumatologie, U.Z. PellenbergKatholieke Universiteit LeuvenBelgium
  3. 3.Dienst Botpathologie, A.Z.UtrechtThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Health Science CenterOklahoma CityUSA
  5. 5.LegendoOnderwijs en NavorsingLeuvenBelgium