Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 249–255

Use of elemental sulphur to enhance a cadmium solubilization and its vegetative removal from contaminated soil

Authors

  • R. Tichý
    • Institute of Landscape EcologyCzech Academy of Sciences
  • J. Fajtl
    • Faculty of Agriculture, Department of General Plant ProductionUniversity of South Bohemia
  • S. Kužel
    • Faculty of Agriculture, Department of General Plant ProductionUniversity of South Bohemia
  • L. Kolář
    • Faculty of Agriculture, Department of General Plant ProductionUniversity of South Bohemia
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00420560

Cite this article as:
Tichý, R., Fajtl, J., Kužel, S. et al. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst (1996) 46: 249. doi:10.1007/BF00420560

Abstract

To a soil artificially contaminated with cadmium, orthorhombic sulphur flower and a hydrophillic microbially produced elemental sulphur were added to induce the soil acidification. The soil was incubated in pots under opensky conditions. pH, sulphate, and cadmium solubility were recorded in time. Soil acidification with microbially produced sulphur proceeded without any delay and at considerably higher rates, compared to the sulphur flower. Cadmium solubilization was solely controlled by the soil pH during the experiments. Similar experiments with cultivation of common mustard (Sinapis alba, cultivar JARA) were performed, evaluating both changes of cadmium solubilization and uptake by biomass. Cadmium concentration in shoots increased with decreasing pH. However, biomass was negatively affected by the decreasing pH. Combining these two effects, a pH-optimum for maximum cadmium removal from the soil by plants was found at pH=5–5.5.

Key words

biological sulphurheavy metalsphytoremediationsoil sanitationvegetative uptake

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997