Human Genetics

, Volume 68, Issue 3, pp 221–227

Human genes for glutathione S-transferases

  • V. Laisney
  • Nguyen Van Cong
  • M. S. Gross
  • J. Frezal
Original Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF00418392

Cite this article as:
Laisney, V., Van Cong, N., Gross, M.S. et al. Hum Genet (1984) 68: 221. doi:10.1007/BF00418392

Summary

The tissue distribution of different glutathione S-transferases (GST) is analysed by electrophoresis.
  1. 1)

    The existence of GST“e” (erythrocyte), GST3, GST1, and GST2 is confirmed. GST“e” the fastest and most thermolabile of different GST analysed is observed only in erythrocyte cells. GST3 which migrates more slowly than GST“e” is present in all tissues and cells analysed, excepted for erythrocyte cells in which only GST“e” is observed. GST1 presents a polymorphism with four phenotypes 1, 1/2, 2, and 0 controlled by three alleles 1, 2, and 0 (null). With the sample of 56 livers analysed the different frequencies obtained are 9%, 5%, 43%, 43% for the phenotypes 1, 1/2, 2, and 0 respectively and 0.074 (p), 0.279 (q), 0.647 (r) for the alleles 1, 2, and 0 (null). GST2 presents variant patterns due probably, in the majority of cases, to post-synthetic modifications rather than allelic variation.

     
  2. 2)

    Two new GST are described, GST4 and GST5. GST4 abundant in muscle tissue is a dimeric protein. GST4 forms with GST1 a heterodimeric band. GST5 is observed in brain homogenates.

     
  3. 3)

    For the chromosome localization the results obtained by man (leucocytes)-mouse somatic cell hybrid analysis indicate that the gene for leucocytes GST is on chromosome 11. This gene is the structural GST3 gene.

     

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Laisney
    • 1
  • Nguyen Van Cong
    • 1
  • M. S. Gross
    • 1
  • J. Frezal
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinique et Unité de Recherches de Génétique Médicale (INSERM U12)Hôpital des Enfants MaladesParis Cedex 15France