Planta

, Volume 132, Issue 3, pp 209–214

Chromium uptake and transport in barley seedlings (Hordeum vulgare L.)

  • R. A. Skeffington
  • P. R. Shewry
  • P. J. Peterson
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00399719

Cite this article as:
Skeffington, R.A., Shewry, P.R. & Peterson, P.J. Planta (1976) 132: 209. doi:10.1007/BF00399719

Summary

Potassium chromate is more toxic to the growth of barley in solution culture than chromic chloride, though apparent uptake of the latter is much faster. Inhibitor studies indicate that CrO42- uptake is “active” whereas Cr3+ uptake is passive, demonstrating that the two forms do not share a common uptake mechanism. Studies on the form of Cr inside root cells show that in plants fed CrO42- the Cr remains largely unchanged whereas in plants fed Cr3+ a little CrO42- (0.5 per cent) is produced. This conversion is dependent on the presence of living material and is probably enzymatic. Chromate uptake follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics at low concentration and is competitively inhibited by sulphate. Transport of chromium up the root is very slow, accounting for the low levels of Cr in the shoots. Chromate is transported better than Cr3+ though still to a very limited extent. These experiments provide a physiological basis for previous observations.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Skeffington
    • 1
  • P. R. Shewry
    • 1
  • P. J. Peterson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Botany and BiochemistryWestfield College (University of London)LondonUK
  2. 2.Department of BotanyUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  3. 3.Department of BiochemistryRothamsted Experimental StationHarpendenUK