Marine Biology

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 69–77

Luminescence from non-bioluminescent tissues in oceanic cephalopods

  • R. E. Young
  • C. F. E. Roper
  • K. Mangold
  • G. Leisman
  • F. G. HochbergJr.
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00386530

Cite this article as:
Young, R.E., Roper, C.F.E., Mangold, K. et al. Mar. Biol. (1979) 53: 69. doi:10.1007/BF00386530

Abstract

Several tissues (e.g. kidney, blood, digestive gland) in oceanic cephalopods which do not exhibit in vivo bioluminescence, luminesce when homogenized in the presence of air or when simply exposed to air in a vial (blood). The source of the luminescence appears to be a luciferin: treatment of kidney homogenates and blood with a photophore extract presumably containing luciferase resulted in a 20-fold increase in light production. Luminescence was also found in the renal fluid, which may be the source of luminescent clouds produced by squids. The variability in luminescence found in some tissues of cephalopods appeared to be related to feeding. Luminescence was also detected in the digestive glands of midwater octopods.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Young
    • 1
  • C. F. E. Roper
    • 2
  • K. Mangold
    • 3
  • G. Leisman
    • 4
  • F. G. HochbergJr.
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of OceanographyUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA
  2. 2.Department of Invertebrate Zoology, National Museum of Natural HistorySmithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C.USA
  3. 3.Laboratoire AragoBanyuls-sur-MerFrance
  4. 4.Scripps Institution of OceanographyLa JollaUSA
  5. 5.Santa Barbara Museum of Natural HistorySanta BarbaraUSA