Oecologia

, Volume 79, Issue 3, pp 344–352

Spacing and kinship in the Formosan squirrel living in different habitats

  • Noriko Tamura
  • Fumio Hayashi
  • Kazuyoshi Miyashita
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00384313

Cite this article as:
Tamura, N., Hayashi, F. & Miyashita, K. Oecologia (1989) 79: 344. doi:10.1007/BF00384313

Summary

Spacing and kinship of the Formosan squirrel, Callosciurus erythraeus thaiwanensis, were studied in two different habitats. One, native habitat in the woods of Kenting, southern Formosa, was rich in available food throughout the year and had several species of predators. The other, a site in Kamakura, central Japan where squirrels had been introduced, had relatively scanty food and few potential predators. 1. Home ranges among males and between sexes overlapped extensively in both habitats. 2. Females occupied exclusive home ranges in Kamakura but had small overlapping home ranges in Ken-ting. 3. Most males disappeared from their natal areas at 1 year old in both habitats (86% in Kamakura and 93% in Ken-ting), but less females disappeared (36% in Kamakura and 35% in Ken-ting). 4. In Kamakura, daughters settled adjacent to the mother or inherited the home range of the mother, but never shared the mother's home range. In Ken-ting, 35% of daughters shared the home range with their mothers. 5. Tolerance among female kin in Ken-ting was probably facilitated by the richness of available food throughout the year, and functioned to reduce predation risk via alarm calling and mobbing.

Key words

SpacingKinshipFoodPredationCallosciurus

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noriko Tamura
    • 1
  • Fumio Hayashi
    • 1
  • Kazuyoshi Miyashita
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Faculty of ScienceTokyo Metropolitan UniversityTokyoJapan