Oecologia

, Volume 70, Issue 1, pp 149–154

Partitioning the transplant site effect in reciprocal transplant experiments with Impatiens capensis and Impatiens pallida

  • Daniel J. Schoen
  • Steven C. Stewart
  • Martin J. Lechowicz
  • Graham Bell
Original Papers

DOI: 10.1007/BF00377125

Cite this article as:
Schoen, D.J., Stewart, S.C., Lechowicz, M.J. et al. Oecologia (1986) 70: 149. doi:10.1007/BF00377125

Summary

Modified reciprocal transplant experiments were conducted with the annual plant species Impatients capensis and I. pallida to partition the influence of environment on fitness into two components; that of (1) conspecific neighbours occupying each transplant site, and (2) the abiotic and biotic features of each site exclusive of the conspecific neighbours. In the within-species reciprocal transplant series, differences in survivorship and fruit production by cleistogamous flowers were attributable primarily to the effect of conspecific neighbours. In addition, plants surrounded by neighbours from the site of origin produced significantly more fruit from chasmogamous flowers compared with plants surrounded by neighbours from the alien site. In the between-species reciprocal transplant series, one transplant site was consistently associated with greater survivorship and fruit production regardless of the identity of neighbouring plants. The results suggest that different aspects of the environment in these reciprocal transplant experiments (conspecific neighbours, other species, physical factors) determine fitness in different situations.

Key words

Transplant experimentSurvivorshipFruit productionNeighbour effectsImpatiens capensisImpatiens pullidaBalsminaceae

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Schoen
    • 1
  • Steven C. Stewart
    • 1
  • Martin J. Lechowicz
    • 1
  • Graham Bell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada