, Volume 431, Issue 1, pp 66-75

Peptide YY release after intraduodenal, intraileal, and intracolonic administration of nutrients in rats

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Abstract

Peptide YY (PYY) release was studied by measuring radioimmunoassayable PYY in the arterial plasma of anaesthetized rats receiving into the duodenum, ileum or colon either a complete semi-liquid meal (3 ml, 21 kJ) or elemental nutrients as isocaloric or isoosmolar solutions. PYY release induced by the intraduodenal meal peaked at 60 min and lasted more than 120 min. The integrated response of PYY over 120 min was larger when the meal was administered into the duodenum than into the ileum. The undigested meal induced no release of PYY over a 120-min period when administered into the colon. When injected into the duodenum in isocaloric amounts to the meal, glucose and amino acids led to the release of as much PYY as did the meal, whereas oleic acid led to the release of less PYY. Part of these responses were due to osmolarity, since administration of intraduodenal hyperosmolar saline led to the release of about half as much PYY as did hyperosmolar glucose. In moderate amounts, and injected as a solution isoosmolar to plasma, oleic acid was a major PYY releaser; the amounts released were at least two times larger when oleic acid was administered into the duodenum than into the ileum and colon. Isoosmolar glucose and amino acids led to the release of no PYY when injected into the duodenum, but were nearly as active as oleic acid in the colon. Short-chain fatty acids induced the release of PYY when injected into the colon, but not into the ileum. Hexamethonium suppressed PYY release induced by the intraduodenal meal, but did not change PYY release induced by glucose or oleic acid in the colon. Urethane anaesthesia did not reduce PYY release induced by the intraduodenal meal. These results suggest that two mechanisms at least contribute to PYY release in the rat. An indirect, neural mechanism, involving nicotinic synapses, is prominent in the proximal small intestine; the stimulation is transmitted to ileal and colonic L-cells by undetermined pathways, but contact of nutrients with L-cells is not needed. Another mechanism, probably direct and quantitatively smaller, occurs in the distal intestine when nutrients come into contact with the mucosa containing L-cells. Glucose, fatty acids and amino acids stimulate differentially the proximal and distal mechanisms.