Cytotechnology

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 87–94

Homogenisation and oxygen transfer rates in large agitated and sparged animal cell bioreactors: Some implications for growth and production

  • Alvin W. Nienow
  • Christian Langheinrich
  • Neil C. Stevenson
  • A Nicholas Emery
  • Timothy M. Clayton
  • Nigel K. H. Slater
Special Issue

DOI: 10.1007/BF00353927

Cite this article as:
Nienow, A.W., Langheinrich, C., Stevenson, N.C. et al. Cytotechnology (1996) 22: 87. doi:10.1007/BF00353927

Abstract

Because of concern for cell damage, very low agitation energy inputs have been used in industrial animal cell bioreactors, typical values being two orders of magnitude less than those found in bacterial fermentations. Aeration rates are also very small. As a result, such bioreactors might be both poorly mixed and also unable to provide the higher oxygen up-take rates demanded by more intensive operation. This paper reports experimental studies both of KL a and of mixing (via pH measurements) in bioreactors up to 8 m3 at Wellcome and of scaled down models of such reactors at Birmingham. Alongside these physical measurements, sensitivity of certain cell lines to continuously controlled dO2 has been studied and the oxygen up-take rates measured in representative growth conditions. An analysis of characteristic times and mixing theory, together with other recent work showing that more vigorous agitation and aeration can be used especially in the presence of Pluronic F-68, indicates ways of improving their performance. pH gradients offer a special challenge.

Key words

cell culturemixing timeoxygen demandoxygen transferpH and dO2 sensitivityscale-up

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alvin W. Nienow
    • 1
  • Christian Langheinrich
    • 1
  • Neil C. Stevenson
    • 1
  • A Nicholas Emery
    • 1
  • Timothy M. Clayton
    • 2
  • Nigel K. H. Slater
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.BBSRC Centre for Biochemical EngineeringThe University of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  2. 2.Glaxo WellcomeBeckenhamUK
  3. 3.The Dept of Chemical EngineeringAston UniversityBirminghamUK