Mammalian Genome

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 171–176

Genetic mapping of the X-linked dominant mutations striated (Str) and bare patches (Bpa) to a 600-kb region of the mouse X Chromosome: implications for mapping human disorders in Xq28

  • Tiffany A. Angel
  • Cynthia J. Faust
  • Juanita C. Gonzales
  • Susan Kenwrick
  • Richard Alan Lewis
  • Gail E. Herman
Original Contributions

DOI: 10.1007/BF00352233

Cite this article as:
Angel, T.A., Faust, C.J., Gonzales, J.C. et al. Mammalian Genome (1993) 4: 171. doi:10.1007/BF00352233

Abstract

Striated (Str) and bare patches (Bpa) are X-irradiation-induced, X-linked dominant mouse mutations that are lethal prenatally in hemizygous males. To map the Str mutation, we generated a backcross involving Mus castaneus. Pedigree analysis of 193 affected female and normal male progeny from the cross places Str extremely close to DXMIT1 and favors a gene order of (Cf-9)-Ids-Gabra3-DXS1104h-(Str, DXMIT1)-F8a-DXPas8-DXBay6-DXMIT6 for the loci studied. This region of the mouse X Chromosome (Chr) is syntenic with proximal human Xq28. Based on the mode of inheritance and clinical phenotype, Str may be a homolog of human familial incontinentia pigmenti (IP2). Further refinement of our genetic mapping of bare patches positions that locus between DXS1104h and DXPas8 in the same region as Str, raising the possibility that Bpa and Str may be allelic or are due to mutations in overlapping contiguous genes.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tiffany A. Angel
    • 1
  • Cynthia J. Faust
    • 1
  • Juanita C. Gonzales
    • 1
  • Susan Kenwrick
    • 4
  • Richard Alan Lewis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gail E. Herman
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Molecular GeneticsBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Department of MedicineUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  5. 5.Department of GeneticsCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA