Transcellular emigration of blood cells during ascidian metamorphosis

  • Richard A. Cloney
  • Leslie Grimm
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00335222

Cite this article as:
Cloney, R.A. & Grimm, L. Z. Zellforsch. (1970) 107: 157. doi:10.1007/BF00335222

Summary

During the first 10 minutes after the onset of metamorphosis in the ascidian Amaroucium constellatum there is a massive emigration of blood cells (granulocytes) from the hemocoel, across the epidermis, into the tunic. Electron microscopy has been employed to extend some of the classical observations of the last century. The new findings are compatible with the hypothesis that the blood cells follow a transcellular pathway. Our interpretation is as follows: an emigrating cell enters the basal part of an epidermal cell and becomes enclosed within a vacuole. The vacuole and the blood cell move to the apex of the epidermal cell. The vacuole fuses with the plasmalemma releasing the blood cell into the tunic. Blood cells can therefore pass through the epidermis without leaving a hole and without rupturing intercellular junctions.

Key-Words

Ascidians Metamorphosis Blood cells Epidermis 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Cloney
    • 1
    • 2
  • Leslie Grimm
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattle
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesStanford UniversityPalo Alto