Journal of Neurology

, Volume 238, Issue 6, pp 345–348

A case of progressive supranuclear palsy with widespread senile plaques

  • Shoichi Sasaki
  • Shoichi Maruyama
  • Chisato Toyoda
Original Communications

DOI: 10.1007/BF00315336

Cite this article as:
Sasaki, S., Maruyama, S. & Toyoda, C. J Neurol (1991) 238: 345. doi:10.1007/BF00315336

Summary

A case of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) with frontal lobe atrophy is reported, in which many senile plaques were widely distributed in the neocortex, the entorhinal cortex, the amygdala, and, to a lesser extent, the cerebellar cortex, but not in the hippocampus. Most of the plaques were of the diffuse and primitive types. They were well visualized by β-protein immunostaining, modified Bielschowsky staining and methenamine silver staining, but were not seen by Bodian staining. The widespread distribution of senile plaques in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices was far beyond that seen in normal aging, and was reminiscent of concomitant Alzheimer's disease (AD). Unlike AD, however, this case had neither senile changes in the hippocampus nor neurofibrillary tangles in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex. It seems that many senile plaques may appear widely in the cerebral cortex and even, to a lesser extent, in the cerebellar cortex of some patients with PSP. Additional case studies using sensitive silver and amyloid antibody preparations are required to elucidate the presence of senile plaques in the cerebral cortex of PSP.

Key words

β-ProteinCerebellar cortexCerebral cortexProgressive supranuclear palsySenile plaques

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shoichi Sasaki
    • 1
  • Shoichi Maruyama
    • 1
  • Chisato Toyoda
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Neurological InstituteTokyo Women's Medical CollegeTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of PathologyTokyo Women's Medical CollegeTokyoJapan