Journal of Neurology

, Volume 234, Issue 1, pp 9–13

Regional cerebral blood flow in man at rest and during exercise

  • K. Herholz
  • W. Buskies
  • M. Rist
  • G. Pawlik
  • W. Hollmann
  • W. D. Heiss
Original Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF00314001

Cite this article as:
Herholz, K., Buskies, W., Rist, M. et al. J Neurol (1987) 234: 9. doi:10.1007/BF00314001

Summary

Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the left hemisphere was measured in 12 healthy young men at rest and during physical work on a bicycle ergometer in the supine position at work-load levels of 25 W or 100 W using the intravenous 133Xe method. Regional mean cerebral blood flow, regional gray-matter flow, and relative gray-matter weight was determined for six regions of interest. Arterial blood pressure, pulse frequency and expiratory CO2 concentration were recorded. Cerebral blood flow in all regions was significantly (P<0.001) higher during exercise than at rest. The increase in the 100 W group (24.7%) was significantly (P<0.05) greater than in the 25 W group (13.5%), but resting blood flow levels and alveolar CO2 concentrations were also different in both groups. Mean arterial blood pressure, pulse frequency and alveolar CO2 concentrations, but not arterial pCO2, were significantly higher during exercise and there was a faster washout of whole-body xenon. The CBF increase was interpreted as a combined effect of elevated systemic blood pressure and functionally activated brain metabolism. There was no evidence of impaired cerebral autoregulation.

Key words

Cerebral blood flow133XeExerciseAutoregulation

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Herholz
    • 1
  • W. Buskies
    • 2
  • M. Rist
    • 2
  • G. Pawlik
    • 1
  • W. Hollmann
    • 2
  • W. D. Heiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für neurologische ForschungKöln 91 (Merheim)Federal Republik of Germany
  2. 2.Institut für Kreislaufforschung und Sportmedizin der Deutschen Sporthochschule KölnFederal Republik of Germany