Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology

, Volume 108, Issue 1, pp 82–92

The compressibility of silicate liquids containing Fe2O3 and the effect of composition, temperature, oxygen fugacity and pressure on their redox states

  • Victor C. Kress
  • Ian S. E. Carmichael
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00307328

Cite this article as:
Kress, V.C. & Carmichael, I.S.E. Contr. Mineral. and Petrol. (1991) 108: 82. doi:10.1007/BF00307328

Abstract

Ultrasonic longitudinal acoustic velocities in oxidized silicate liquids indicate that the pressure derivative of the partial-molar volume of Fe2O3 is the same in iron-rich alkali-, alkaline earth- and natural silicate melt compositions at 1 bar. The dV/dP for multicomponent silicate liquids can be expressed as a linear combination of partial-molar constants plus a positive excess term for Na2O−Al2O3 mixing. Partial-molar properties for FeO and Fe2O3 components allow extension of the empirical expression of Sack et al. (1980) to permit the calculation of Fe-redox equilibrium in a natural silicate liquid as a function of composition, temperature, fo2 and pressure; a more formal thermodynamic expression is presented in the Appendix. The predicted equilibrium fo2 of natural silicate melts, of fixed oxygen content, closely parallels that defined by the metastable assemblage fayalite+magnetite+β-quartz (FMQ), in pressure-temperature space. A silicate melt initially equilibrated at 3 GPa and FMQ, will remain within approximately 0.5 log10 units of FMQ during its closed-system ascent. Thus, for magmas closed to oxygen, iron-redox equilibrium in crystal-poor pristine glassy lavas represents an excellent probe of the relative oxidation state of their source regions.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victor C. Kress
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ian S. E. Carmichael
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Geology and GeophysicsUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Geological SciencesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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